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Clover broomrape

Invasive Species Information

Clover broomrape Biodiversity Medium Risk Invasive Species 14

What Is Clover broomrape - (Orobanche minor )?

Habitat: Terrestrial
Distribution in Ireland:

Status: Established

Family name: Orobanchaceae

Common name/s: Hellroot, Common broomrape, Lesser broomrape, Small broomrape, Clover broomrape

Reproduction

The species has efficient seed dispersal and is largely inbreeding so that populations preferentially parasitizing a particular species which has its own clear ecological preferences may become effectively isolated and eventually may produce distinct taxa.

Clover broomrape Biodiversity Medium Risk Invasive Species 14

Clover broomrape flower

The plants are attached to their host by means of haustoria, which transfer nutrients from the host to the parasite.

 

Only the hemiparasitic species possess an additional extensive root system. The root system is reduced as its function is mainly anchorage of the plant.

Clover broomrape Biodiversity Medium Risk Invasive Species 14

The species appears in a wide range of colours from red-brown, yellow-brown to purple.

 

Yellow specimens are also not uncommon and it is this extreme variability that makes identification on the basis of size or colour uncertain. 

 

It is parasitic on various members of the pea (Fabaceae) and daisy (Asteraceae) families.

Clover broomrape stand

Clover broomrape grows to 0.5 m and is a perennial. The flowers are hermaphrodite.

Common broomrape grows in a wide variety of soils, namely moist, light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils that are acid, neutral or basic. It can grow in semi-shade or in full sunlight.

 

Although widespread, its appearance is sporadic; despite this, it can occur in vast colonies from time to time.

 

The main flowering season in the northern hemisphere is from May until the end of August and from August to January in the southern hemisphere. 

 

Clover broomrape Biodiversity Medium Risk Invasive Species 14

Clover broomrape ID Guide

How To Identify Clover broomrape?

Leaf
Flower
Stem/Twig
Bark:

Fruit:

Smell:

Seed:

Root

Clover broomrape Biodiversity Medium Risk Invasive Species 14

Clover broomrape #3

Clover broomrape Biodiversity Medium Risk Invasive Species 14

Clover broomrape #4

Why Is Clover broomrape A Problem?

Clover broomrape is an alien (non-native) invasive plant, meaning it out-competes crowds-out and displaces beneficial native plants that have been naturally growing in Ireland for centuries.

 

This web page is currently under development - we have an anticipated update for early 2018. 

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European Communities (Birds and Natural Habitats) Regulations 2011 non-native invasive plant species A-Z (Updated 2017)

There are currently 35 invasive plant species listed in the European Communities (Birds and Natural Habitats) Regulations (annex 2, Part 1)...

 

Click on a species from the following list to find out more regarding non-native species subject to restrictions under Regulations 49 and 50.

Additional Non-Native Plant Species identified as Medium Risk on Ireland's Biodiversity List...

Common name 

African woodsorrel

American skunk cabbage

Annual bur-sage

Antithamnionella ternifolia

Barberry

Black currant

Brazilian waterweed

Butterfly-bush

Canadian-fleabane

Clover broomrape

Creeping Bellflower

Dead man's fingers

Douglas fir

Early goldenrod

False acacia

Field penny-cress

Garden lupin

Giant rhubarb

Hairy rocket

Himalayan honeysuckle

Himalayan knotweed

Holm oak

Japanese barberry

Japanese honeysuckle

Japanese rose

Leafy spurge

Least duckweed

Narrow-leaved ragwort

New Zealand bur

Ostrich fern

Pampas grass

Pitcherplant

Red oak

Red sheath tunicate

Rock cotoneaster

Rum cherry

Russian-vine

Salmonberry

Sea-buckthorn

Sycamore

Three-cornered garlic

Traveler's-joy

Tree of heaven

Turkey oak

Virginia-creeper

Warty cabbage

Water fern

Wild parsnip

Environment 

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Freshwater

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Freshwater 

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Marine 

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Risk score 

14

15

17

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14

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14

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17

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17

14

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14

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14

14

14

14

14

14

14

17

14

14

14

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17

17

14

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14

15