© 2019 www,japaneseknotweedkillers.com  -  The Knotweed Removal Experts  -  Invasive Weed Specialists  -  Call +353 (0)86-250-8805

Dead man's fingers

Invasive Species Information

Creeping Bellflower  - Campanula rapunculoides Biodiversity Medium Risk Invasive Species 14

What Is Dead man's fingers  - (Codium fragile ssp. tomentosoides)?

Habitat: Aquatic, marine
Distribution in Ireland: Unknown

Status: Established

Family name: Codiaceae

Common name/s: green sea fingers, dead man's fingers, felty fingers, forked felt-alga, stag seaweed, sponge seaweed, green sponge, green fleece and oyster thief

Reproduction

Clover broomrape Biodiversity Medium Risk Invasive Species 14

Dead man's fingers #1

Clover broomrape Biodiversity Medium Risk Invasive Species 14

Dead man's fingers #2

Dead man's fingers is a species of seaweed in the family Codiaceae. It originates in the Pacific Ocean near Japan and has become an invasive species on the coasts of the Northern Atlantic Ocean.

 

This siphonous green alga is dark green in color. It appears as a fuzzy patch of tubular fingers. These formations hang down from rocks during low tide, hence the nickname "dead man's fingers". 

The "fingers" are branches up to a centimeter wide and sometimes over 30 centimeters long.

Codium fragile occurs in the low intertidal zone, and subtidal on high-energy beaches.

It has no asexual (sporophyte) stage, and male and female gametes are both produced on separate plants.

Codium fragile subsp. atlanticum is known to have arrived in the southwest of Ireland around 1808. From there it may have spread by rafting or floating in the sea. Approximately 30 years later, it was found in Scotland. It is thought to have originally come from the Pacific Ocean near Japan.

This species displaces the native Codium tomentosum.

Clover broomrape Biodiversity Medium Risk Invasive Species 14

Dead man's fingers Codium fragile ssp. tomentosoides​ ID Guide

How To Identify Dead man's fingers?

Fond

Seed:

Holdfast

Clover broomrape Biodiversity Medium Risk Invasive Species 14

Dead man's fingers #3

Clover broomrape Biodiversity Medium Risk Invasive Species 14

Dead man's fingers #4

Why Is Dead man's fingers A Problem?

Dead man's fingers is an alien (non-native) invasive plant, meaning it out-competes crowds-out and displaces beneficial native plants that have been naturally growing in Ireland for centuries.

 

This web page is currently under development - we have an anticipated update for early 2018. 

Sign up for our free monthly news letter and get regular updates, information and resources to help you identify and manage alien invasive species on you property.

We apologise for any inconvenience.  Please try again later.

European Communities (Birds and Natural Habitats) Regulations 2011 non-native invasive plant species A-Z (Updated 2017)

There are currently 35 invasive plant species listed in the European Communities (Birds and Natural Habitats) Regulations (annex 2, Part 1)...

 

Click on a species from the following list to find out more regarding non-native species subject to restrictions under Regulations 49 and 50.

Additional Non-Native Plant Species identified as Medium Risk on Ireland's Biodiversity List...

Common name 

African woodsorrel

American skunk cabbage

Annual bur-sage

Antithamnionella ternifolia

Barberry

Black currant

Brazilian waterweed

Butterfly-bush

Canadian-fleabane

Clover broomrape

Creeping Bellflower

Dead man's fingers

Douglas fir

Early goldenrod

False acacia

Field penny-cress

Garden lupin

Giant rhubarb

Hairy rocket

Himalayan honeysuckle

Himalayan knotweed

Holm oak

Japanese barberry

Japanese honeysuckle

Japanese rose

Leafy spurge

Least duckweed

Narrow-leaved ragwort

New Zealand bur

Ostrich fern

Pampas grass

Pitcherplant

Red oak

Red sheath tunicate

Rock cotoneaster

Rum cherry

Russian-vine

Salmonberry

Sea-buckthorn

Sycamore

Three-cornered garlic

Traveler's-joy

Tree of heaven

Turkey oak

Virginia-creeper

Warty cabbage

Water fern

Wild parsnip

Environment 

Terrestrial

Terrestrial

Terrestrial

Marine

Terrestrial 

Terrestrial

Freshwater

Terrestrial 

Terrestrial 

Terrestrial 

Terrestrial 

Marine 

Terrestrial 

Terrestrial 

Terrestrial 

Terrestrial 

Terrestrial

Terrestrial

Terrestrial 

Terrestrial

Terrestrial

Terrestrial 

Terrestrial 

Terrestrial 

Terrestrial

Terrestrial 

Freshwater 

Terrestrial 

Terrestrial 

Terrestrial 

Terrestrial  

Terrestrial 

Terrestrial 

Marine 

Terrestrial 

Terrestrial 

Terrestrial

Terrestrial

Terrestrial

Terrestrial 

Terrestrial

Terrestrial 

Terrestrial 

Terrestrial 

Terrestrial 

Terrestrial 

Freshwater 

Terrestrial

Risk score 

14

15

17

15

14

14

17

17

14

17

16

16

15

14

17

17

17

16

17

14

16

14

14

15

14

16

14

16

14

14

14

14

14

14

14

17

14

14

14

15

15

17

17

14

16

15

14

15